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Mayor Gray Launches Second Phase of One City - One Hire Campaign to Lower Unemployment


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(WASHINGTON, DC) – In an effort to reach thousands of District residents who are out of work, Mayor Vincent C. Gray and officials from the DC Department of Employment Services (DOES) today launched the second phase of the One City • One Hire campaign, an initiative the Mayor first announced in early September designed to encourage businesses in the Washington metropolitan area to hire qualified, unemployed District residents.

The initial focus of the campaign centered on creating public-private partnerships with local employers by offering them a number of DOES support services and incentives to help reduce the District’s high unemployment rate. One City • One Hire – Phase II will now focus on the needs of the District’s unemployed job seekers – particularly the thousands who are not in the system and, therefore, not being counted among the unemployed.

“One City • One Hire has developed partnerships with over 330 businesses and helped over 1,000 District residents find jobs in the last 90 days. While our efforts have been successful thus far, this is just the beginning,” said Mayor Gray. “To reach the thousands of unemployed residents who still need assistance and additional training in this tough economy, DOES will launch an outreach campaign unlike anything we’ve seen in District before.”

One City • One Hire – Phase II has been designed to reach out to disconnected, unemployed District residents and get them registered in the DOES system. Once in the system, they can learn about various training programs offered by DOES to prepare them for the workforce. Qualified, unemployed residents who are registered at OneCityOneHire.org will be able to identify job opportunities that fit their skill sets and be pre-screened and matched with One City • One Hire employer partners who have job openings to fill.

“This second phase of the One City • One Hire campaign has been developed to reach all segments of the population, in all areas of the city – and particularly those who have never interacted with DOES, those who are unaware of the many services the agency has to offer and those hard-to-serve populations who are facing the most barriers to employment,” said DOES Director Lisa María Mallory. “We are extremely pleased that so many employers are accepting Mayor Gray’s challenge to help address the District’s unemployment crisis. Now we must turn our attention to the needs of the unemployed job seekers to ensure they are trained and work-ready. One City • One Hire – Phase II does just that.”

One City • One Hire – Phase II will utilize a combination of traditional media (e.g., newspapers, television and radio) and new media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter and text messaging) to reach the unemployed. Public service announcements will air on local radio and TV stations and on the District’s cable channels in English, Spanish and other languages. Marketing collateral and other promotional materials being developed will also be translated in multiple languages and distributed citywide. In addition, the DOES Mobile One-Stop unit will register individuals at community events across the city, and registration events will be held in collaboration with local libraries, churches, and various community organizations in all eight wards.

“We’re collaborating with the Office on Latino Affairs, the Office on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs, the Office on Religious Affairs, and the D.C. Public Library to host One City • One Hire registration events at many of the 25 libraries and at community organizations throughout the District,” said Mallory. “DOES will also work with the Department of Human Services, the Department of Health and other sister agencies to conduct outreach to their constituencies. We’ve got to reach as many of DC’s unemployed as possible and register them with OneCityOneHire.org. The campaign tag line, ‘Your Next Job Could Be Just A Click Away,’ will be our calling card.”

Data gathered from the campaign will be analyzed to determine if individuals should be referred to a DOES special program or other social-services agencies to better prepare them for employment opportunities throughout the metropolitan area.