Mayor Vincent C. Gray

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June 16, 2011

Mayor Vincent Gray and Community Partners Seek To Curb Learning Lost During the Summer Months 

‘READ and LEARN This Summer’ Program Focuses on Educational Activities

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(WASHINGTON, D.C.) —Mayor Gray and the city's education leaders visited the Deanwood Neighborhood Library today to launch the next phase of the “One City Summer Fun … Something for Everyone” initiative, “READ and LEARN this Summer.” This component of the comprehensive summer program encourages residents to take advantage of educational programs that cover everything from summer reading for children to adult literacy.

Students who don’t read over the summer or participate in literacy-related activities like museum visits lose, on average, the equivalent of up to one month’s worth of classroom instruction. Students from low-income or disadvantaged backgrounds can lose two months’ worth. And adults who struggle with reading are unable to qualify for many entry-level or career track jobs.

“The District's commitment to continue improving education doesn't end with children, and it doesn’t close with the end of the school year in June,” said Mayor Gray. “We want our kids to come back to school in the fall ready to pick up where they left off. We want adults to have the skills to continue their education or build a career. This component of the One City Summer Fun program gives everyone a way to find something that will educate and interest them.”

Read and Learn programs are being offered by the D.C. Public Schools, the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), the Community College of the District of Columbia (CCDC), the Office of the State Superintendent for Education and the D.C. Public Library. In addition, more than 40 private and non-profit organizations have partnered with city agencies to conduct reading programs.

UDC and CCDC are offering summer-school classes for adult college-level education. They are also offering the Bridges Program in cooperation with the D.C. Public Schools. This initiative helps prepare D.C. high-school students for the challenges they will face in young adulthood, energizing and educating them about the post-high-school world. It also provides a hands-on experience of what attending an undergraduate institution would be like, so students can gauge whether such an environment would be an appropriate option for them.

To learn more about “One City Summer Fun … Something for Everyone,” visit http://onecitysummer.dc.gov or call 311. You can also follow the initiative on Twitter at www.twitter.com/onecitysummer or Facebook at www.facebook.com/onecitysummer.